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Thursday, April 29

  1. page The Man Who Counted edited ... As far as a required reading assignment, I don't necessarily think this would be the best read…
    ...
    As far as a required reading assignment, I don't necessarily think this would be the best reading material for a middle or high school mathematics class. However, I think some of the problems that Beremiz solves could be used as bell-work/introductory problems to start out the class period. For example, Brett talked about the problem that you can make any number using 4 fours. This problem could be presented to the students and have them work in groups to find as many of these calculations as possible in a certain amount of time. The problem with the 3 brothers and their inheritance of camels could also be presented to the students in groups. These examples would help show that math isn't just numbers on a page, but can be used in real life in certain situations.
    Contributors:
    Brett Montgomery:Montgomery, Chase Helmling: Synopsis and
    Jordan Smith: Synopsis and Review #2, Summary of Class or Student Activity
    (view changes)
    6:41 am

Friday, April 23

  1. 6:59 am

Wednesday, April 21

  1. page The Man Who Counted edited ... Synopsis and Review #2 The Man Who Counted had its interesting moments. The story follows the…
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    Synopsis and Review #2
    The Man Who Counted had its interesting moments. The story follows the travels of two men in the Middle East--one of which, Beremiz (The Man Who Counted) is extremely quick with numbers, patterns, and calculations. He obtained this skill by working as a shepherd and always needing to know if all his sheep were safe and in the same place. One example of his extraordinary talent is as follows: A skeptic did not fully believe that Beremiz was as wise or quick with numbers as he had claimed. The skeptic challenged the man who counted to count the number of birds in a cage. Beremiz took little time to come up with the answer (somewhere near 600--I don't have my book with me right now or I'd have an exact number). He then explained in depth the intricate properties of this number as well as its mathematical oddities and principles. Throughout the book, Beremiz uses his skill to make new friends, obtain new things, and expand his social status, as well as teach others the importance of mathematics. In general, the book was difficult to follow at times because of the region in which the stories originated. Some of the words were very unfamiliar and unexplained--they left me wondering what was happening at times. However, the examples of sheer brilliance in mathematics were very entertaining, especially to someone who has grown up loving numbers and their intricacies--how and why they work. I'm not quite through the book yet, but I will most likely finish it this summer (in 2 weeks!!!!!!)
    Summary of Class or Student Activity
    As far as a required reading assignment, I don't necessarily think this would be the best reading material for a middle or high school mathematics class. However, I think some of the problems that Beremiz solves could be used as bell-work/introductory problems to start out the class period. For example, Brett talked about the problem that you can make any number using 4 fours. This problem could be presented to the students and have them work in groups to find as many of these calculations as possible in a certain amount of time. The problem with the 3 brothers and their inheritance of camels could also be presented to the students in groups. These examples would help show that math isn't just numbers on a page, but can be used in real life in certain situations.

    Contributors:
    Brett Montgomery: Synopsis and Review #1
    ...
    and Review #2#2, Summary of Class or Student Activity
    (view changes)
    9:18 am
  2. page The Man Who Counted edited Review Synopsis and Review #1 The Man Who Counted is a book that follows two men named Beremi…

    ReviewSynopsis and Review #1
    The Man Who Counted is a book that follows two men named Beremiz Samir and Malba Tahan, on their journey to Baghdad. Beremiz is a very smart mathematician who can solve even the most complex math problems. Beremiz and Malba travel town to town helping others with their mathematical problems. One example is that of three brothers who were left 35 camels by their father. Half is to be left to the oldest, 1/3 to the middle, and 1/9 to the youngest. The brothers could not figure out how to do this so Beremiz came up with a solution. He had Malba donate his camel to the dead man's estate so that there are a total of 36 camels, and then gives 18, 12, and 4 camels to the three heirs. Of the two that are left, one is returned to Malba, and then one is claimed by Beremiz for helping them out. The book is filled with many examples like this, each chapter having a new problem for Beremiz to solve. It is kind of a slow read, but you find out some pretty interesting things, like you can make any number using 4 fours. Overall, it is an okay book, but is good to show kids how mathematics can be used to solve real life problems. I would recommend this book to either middle school or high school math students.
    Synopsis and Review #2
    The Man Who Counted had its interesting moments. The story follows the travels of two men in the Middle East--one of which, Beremiz (The Man Who Counted) is extremely quick with numbers, patterns, and calculations. He obtained this skill by working as a shepherd and always needing to know if all his sheep were safe and in the same place. One example of his extraordinary talent is as follows: A skeptic did not fully believe that Beremiz was as wise or quick with numbers as he had claimed. The skeptic challenged the man who counted to count the number of birds in a cage. Beremiz took little time to come up with the answer (somewhere near 600--I don't have my book with me right now or I'd have an exact number). He then explained in depth the intricate properties of this number as well as its mathematical oddities and principles. Throughout the book, Beremiz uses his skill to make new friends, obtain new things, and expand his social status, as well as teach others the importance of mathematics. In general, the book was difficult to follow at times because of the region in which the stories originated. Some of the words were very unfamiliar and unexplained--they left me wondering what was happening at times. However, the examples of sheer brilliance in mathematics were very entertaining, especially to someone who has grown up loving numbers and their intricacies--how and why they work. I'm not quite through the book yet, but I will most likely finish it this summer (in 2 weeks!!!!!!)

    Contributors:
    Brett Montgomery: Synopsis and Review #1
    Jordan Smith: Synopsis and Review #2

    (view changes)
    9:05 am

Thursday, April 15

  1. page The Number Devil edited ... Review: This is an outstanding book that captured my attention fom front to back. There have n…
    ...
    Review: This is an outstanding book that captured my attention fom front to back. There have not been very many books that can gab my attenion; however, Hans Magnus Enzensberger did. There was one thing in this book that I did not like. He used made up words i.e. Rutabagas, instead of the actual word,Square Roots. I believe it is essential for students to know and understand these words. The author did include an index/glossary for teachers/students. The author included several colorful pictures and diagrams to help explain the mathematical ideas and concepts throughout the book. This book would be useful in Algebra and pre-algebra because of the concepts. I like how the author included several extension activities that will provide powerful insight into the concept that were explained throughout the chapter. (David Staszak)
    Review: I was very impressed by both the book's story line and its educational value. The story is enough to keep most readers engaged, and it is obviously an excellent way to introduce certain topics to the classroom. The additional activities included in some chapters were also of great assistance. However, I did not like the way the author made up names for mathematical terms instead of using the actual word. While the glossary in the back did help with this issue, it still would have made things clearer if the proper term had been used in the first place. (Jessica Goodrich)
    ...
    a book. (Laura Chapman)
    Lesson Idea # 1:
    Chapter 6 and 7 of the book introduces and analyzes the Fibonacci triangle, as well as illustrates different patterns to the students. At the start of the class, the students can be asked to quickly read chapter 6, then discuss what they understand about the reading. The teacher can then help students understand any information they struggle with. Students are then split into groups and each group is asked to read a different part of Chapter 7. Once the groups finish their section, one by one they can explain what their part is about, each illustrating a different pattern found in the Fibonacci Triangle. The extension activity at the end of chapter 7 can be used in groups if needed, or assigned as homework.
    ...
    Lesson Idea #3
    Chapter 9 introduces the concept of the infinite series. Students would read the chapter and then additional examples of series could be given. (For instance, a series that contained the "hopping" numbers.) The students would then be broken into groups. Each group would be given the task of coming up with their own infinite series. After the groups were done, they would switch series with another group and determine what number, if any, the series converged on.
    Lesson Idea #4
    One of the concepts that I know a lot of students struggle with is prime numbers. I liked how the number devil showed Robert how to find the prime numbers. The class is do a smilar idea to understand which numbers are prime and which are composite. THe teacher could make a table of all the numbers atleast up to 100. Then together they can cross of the numbers they know are composite until they are left with only prime numbers. FIrst take number 2 which is prime, then remove all multiples of 2 since they cannot be prime. Continue this process for the other numbers as well.

    Group Member and their Contributions:
    Megan Frame: Synopsis, Review, #1st Lesson Idea
    David Staszak: Review, #2 lesson idea
    Laura Chapman: Review, Lesson Idea #4
    Jessica Goodrich: Review, #3rd Lesson Idea
    (view changes)
    6:21 am
  2. page The Number Devil edited ... Review: This is an outstanding book that captured my attention fom front to back. There have n…
    ...
    Review: This is an outstanding book that captured my attention fom front to back. There have not been very many books that can gab my attenion; however, Hans Magnus Enzensberger did. There was one thing in this book that I did not like. He used made up words i.e. Rutabagas, instead of the actual word,Square Roots. I believe it is essential for students to know and understand these words. The author did include an index/glossary for teachers/students. The author included several colorful pictures and diagrams to help explain the mathematical ideas and concepts throughout the book. This book would be useful in Algebra and pre-algebra because of the concepts. I like how the author included several extension activities that will provide powerful insight into the concept that were explained throughout the chapter. (David Staszak)
    Review: I was very impressed by both the book's story line and its educational value. The story is enough to keep most readers engaged, and it is obviously an excellent way to introduce certain topics to the classroom. The additional activities included in some chapters were also of great assistance. However, I did not like the way the author made up names for mathematical terms instead of using the actual word. While the glossary in the back did help with this issue, it still would have made things clearer if the proper term had been used in the first place. (Jessica Goodrich)
    Review: This book was a lot of fun to read. I enjoyed the concept and was wondering what topic the number devil was going to cover next. The number devil did a wonderful job of explaining difficult concepts in a way that was easy for the math-phobic person to understand. The one thing that I did not like about the book was the name the number devil gave to his concepts. They were not the names that we know for example, instead of square numbers he called them hopping numbers. At the end of the book the author did state that the names given are not names your parents or teachers will know so don't use them, but most children don't read that section of a book.
    Lesson Idea # 1:
    Chapter 6 and 7 of the book introduces and analyzes the Fibonacci triangle, as well as illustrates different patterns to the students. At the start of the class, the students can be asked to quickly read chapter 6, then discuss what they understand about the reading. The teacher can then help students understand any information they struggle with. Students are then split into groups and each group is asked to read a different part of Chapter 7. Once the groups finish their section, one by one they can explain what their part is about, each illustrating a different pattern found in the Fibonacci Triangle. The extension activity at the end of chapter 7 can be used in groups if needed, or assigned as homework.
    (view changes)
    6:15 am

Wednesday, April 14

  1. page The Number Devil edited ... Review: Algebra and pre-Algebra classes would find this book most helpful, since the concepts …
    ...
    Review: Algebra and pre-Algebra classes would find this book most helpful, since the concepts align best with those standards. The very last few pages of the book provide an index for the teacher to help find important terms and what chapters to find them in. Detailed pictures provide extra explanation and several chapters even provide extension activities. Overall I found this book to be interesting and useful, but one thing bothers me. Instead of using actual Mathematical terms when explaining ideas, the author uses fictional names for them. For example, “hopping numbers” are what the author calls numbers raised to an exponential power. While he uses the name to help explain the concept, I think the actual terms should be used, to help the students get used to the correct terms and expand their mathematical vocabulary. (Megan M. Frame)
    Review: This is an outstanding book that captured my attention fom front to back. There have not been very many books that can gab my attenion; however, Hans Magnus Enzensberger did. There was one thing in this book that I did not like. He used made up words i.e. Rutabagas, instead of the actual word,Square Roots. I believe it is essential for students to know and understand these words. The author did include an index/glossary for teachers/students. The author included several colorful pictures and diagrams to help explain the mathematical ideas and concepts throughout the book. This book would be useful in Algebra and pre-algebra because of the concepts. I like how the author included several extension activities that will provide powerful insight into the concept that were explained throughout the chapter. (David Staszak)
    Review: I was very impressed by both the book's story line and its educational value. The story is enough to keep most readers engaged, and it is obviously an excellent way to introduce certain topics to the classroom. The additional activities included in some chapters were also of great assistance. However, I did not like the way the author made up names for mathematical terms instead of using the actual word. While the glossary in the back did help with this issue, it still would have made things clearer if the proper term had been used in the first place. (Jessica Goodrich)
    Lesson Idea # 1:
    Chapter 6 and 7 of the book introduces and analyzes the Fibonacci triangle, as well as illustrates different patterns to the students. At the start of the class, the students can be asked to quickly read chapter 6, then discuss what they understand about the reading. The teacher can then help students understand any information they struggle with. Students are then split into groups and each group is asked to read a different part of Chapter 7. Once the groups finish their section, one by one they can explain what their part is about, each illustrating a different pattern found in the Fibonacci Triangle. The extension activity at the end of chapter 7 can be used in groups if needed, or assigned as homework.
    2: Chapter four introduces powers including square roots. In the beginning of class, the students can begin to read the chapter. However, when they come to the square roots, have the students stop reading. Break the clss into groups of three or four and give each group 8 yard sticks. Have them construct a square with lengths of 1 foot. Have the students create the diagnol of the triangle and ask if anyone knows the length of the diagnol. Have the students create a square using the diagnol of the smaller triangle. Have the students create both diagnols of the larger triangle. Showing the students that two of the smaller triangles can fit in the new triangle. See if the students can figure out the length of the first diagnol. After there is a class discussion, continue reading the chapter. Try to possibly connect it to pythagorean theorem
    Lesson Idea #3
    Chapter 9 introduces the concept of the infinite series. Students would read the chapter and then additional examples of series could be given. (For instance, a series that contained the "hopping" numbers.) The students would then be broken into groups. Each group would be given the task of coming up with their own infinite series. After the groups were done, they would switch series with another group and determine what number, if any, the series converged on.

    Group Member and their Contributions:
    Megan Frame: Synopsis, Review, #1st Lesson Idea
    David Staszak: Review, #2 lesson idea
    Laura Chapman:
    Jessica Goodrich: Review, #3rd Lesson Idea
    (view changes)
    7:37 pm
  2. page The Boy Who Reversed Himself edited Synopsis ... strange neighbor who's whose house she ... Four-Space! The books book take…

    Synopsis
    ...
    strange neighbor who'swhose house she
    ...
    Four-Space! The booksbook takes Laura,
    ...
    live in. Initially, Laura begs Omar to take her to four-space. Eventually, she learns how to maneuver herself into four-space alone. Later, Pete finds out, and they both travel to four-space where the subsequently get lost. During their trip, they are captured by inhabitants of the fourth-dimension. Omar must come to their rescue as the creatures want to eat Laura and Pete. At the end of the book, it is revealed that there is an infinite number of dimensions all the way to dimension 'n.' At each dimension, there is a guardian of the dimension below. As the three kids go back to the third-dimension, Omar finally allows Laura to come in to his house where he shows her why no one has been allowed to enter. His legal guardian, the elderly Mr. Campanelli, is the guardian of the dimension below, two-space; and Omar is in training to be the next guardian of the second-dimension. The book concludes with a married Omar and Laura, and Laura having started writing about her adventures, says, " What would happen if it ever fell into the hands of a publisher? I shudder to think..."
    Review
    The Boy Who Reversed Himself is a science-fiction novel the majority of junior high students would love. It discusses the complicated and hard to understand concept of higher level dimensions, particularly the 4th dimension. Students tend to think that math only deals with the second dimension or that there are only three dimensions since the entertainment business, is trying to capture 3D technology. This book helps students realize that there is a lot more out there than just 1D, 2D, and 3D.
    (view changes)
    7:27 pm
  3. page The Boy Who Reversed Himself edited Synopsis The Boy Who Reversed Himself is about Laura, a high school girl who wants to be popula…

    Synopsis
    The Boy Who Reversed Himself is about Laura, a high school girl who wants to be popular; Pete, the popular guy she has a crush on; and Omar, her strange neighbor who's house she has never seen the inside. Even stranger things have been happening to Laura, such as when her paper she had left at home magically appears inside her locker after she was seen stressing about it. Later on, Laura sees Omar and something just looks off about his appearance. She investigates and eventually realizes that everything on his face has been reversed! She confronts him about it, and eventually discovers that he has traveled to a dimension above them: Four-Space! The books takes Laura, Pete, and Omar through a series of adventures in the space above the three-dimensional world we live in.
    Review
    The Boy Who Reversed Himself is a science-fiction novel the majority of junior high students would love. It discusses the complicated and hard to understand concept of higher level dimensions, particularly the 4th dimension. Students tend to think that math only deals with the second dimension or that there are only three dimensions since the entertainment business, is trying to capture 3D technology. This book helps students realize that there is a lot more out there than just 1D, 2D, and 3D.
    (view changes)
    6:41 pm

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